RANGOON — It’s a modest life, but it’s a lot better than what came before.  Father-of-two U Khin Maung Shwe works as a motorcycle taxi driver outside Rangoon. His wife, Daw Ni La, runs a small shop.  They get by mainly on their own efforts, and that’s important to the Kaman Muslim family who came to Htauk Kyan village in Mingaladon Township three years ago, hoping to escape the tough conditions they experienced in the Ramree camp for internally displaced people (IDP) in Arakan State for three years.  “It was very restrictive there. We had to rely on food from donors. And we couldn’t move about freely like we can here.”  By contrast, life in Rangoon feels safe, and free, he said. The couple can see a future. They hope to save money, and to send their children to school.  Losing Everything  The sudden eruption of violence between members of the Buddhist and Muslim communities in Arakan State in 2012 resulted in around 112 deaths and the displacement of hundreds of thousands of people, the majority of whom were Muslims who identify as Rohingyas.  The Muslim Kaman community were also deeply affected, with thousands placed in camps in Ramree, Kyaukphyu and Sittwe townships, for their “safety” according to authorities.  The Kaman are classified as one of Burma’s 135 official ethnic groups and one of seven ethnic subgroups of Arakan State. The total community numbers only around 45,000 people, according to estimates of the Kaman National Progressive Party (KNPP).  Most come from Thandwe, Kyaukphyu, Ramree, Sittwe and Myaybon townships in Arakan State and there are significant communities in Rangoon and Mandalay. Around 12,000 lived in Rangoon prior to 2012, according to the KNPP.  After the 2012 violence, the community increasingly found itself isolated and in an uneasy relationship with elements of both the Buddhist community and the Muslim Rohingya community.  Some 4,000 Kaman fled from camps or other locations to Mandalay and Rangoon in the immediate aftermath of the initial communal violence, the KNPP estimates.  Since then, another 2,000 joined them in the flight to Burma’s two largest cities, according to the party. Among them were a number in 2015 who were granted National Verification Cards and allowed to travel, Kyaukphyu Township administrator U Nyi Nyi Lin told The Irrawaddy.

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23-08-12 Port scene - PHOTO - Jpaing
Title:
Port scene
Date:
23. August 2012
Purchase options Simple slideshow
23-08-12 Port scene - PHOTO - Jpaing
Title:
Port scene
Date:
23. August 2012
Purchase options Simple slideshow
23-08-12 Port scene - PHOTO - Jpaing
Title:
port scene
Date:
23. August 2012
Purchase options Simple slideshow